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Portsmouth 

Portsmouth is near to Sinahwarren Coastal Village - only a short drive away.

The D-Day Story

The D-Day Story Normandy

The D-Day Story tells of the people behind the events of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. The museum is home to the Overlord Embroidery, which tells the story of the operation across 34 hand-stitched panels stretching for a total of 83 metres.

Spinnaker Tower

Spinnaker Tower

Spinnaker Tower – the stunning 170-metre icon located in Portsmouth. Venture across the amazing glass Sky Walk and watch the boats bobbing about in the waves below your feet. Have you a head for heights? If the answer is yes try the Altitude - a cutting-edge virtual reality experience, which takes you on a walk along one of the ‘ribs’.

Royal Armouries - Fort Nelson

Royal Armouries - Fort Nelson

Fort Nelson is home to the Royal Armouries national collection of artillery and historic cannon and the big guns. The fort is a fully restored Victorian fort with its high ramparts, original fortifications, massive parade ground and underground tunnels. Add this to 7,000 pieces of artillery from across the world and spanning 600 years of history, makes this a great day out.

HMS Warrior 1860

HMS Warrior 1860

HMS Warrior is Britain's first iron-hulled, armoured warship. Built in 1860 and was the pride of Queen Victoria's fleet. In her day she was the worlds largest, fastest and most powerful ship and the ultimate deterrent of her day. Restored and back at home in Portsmouth, Warrior now serves as a ship museum, monument, visitor attraction.

HMS Victory

HMS Victory

HMS Victory is the Royal Navy's most famous warship. A 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, ordered in 1758, laid down in 1759 and launched in 1765. She has been the flagship of the First Sea Lord since October 2012 and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission, Best known for her role in the Battle of Trafalgar, Having served as Vice-Admiral Lord Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar.

The Mary Rose

The Mary Rose

The Mary Rose built between 1509 and 1511 for King Henry VIII, and was one of the first ships able to fire a broadside. After a long and successful career, she sank accidentally during an engagement with the French fleet in 1545. After a 34 year conservation project, the Mary Rose is now fully on display within her purpose-built museum

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